the-cub-among-us:

weloveshortvideos:

Why you should never try to kill spiders with hair spray!

Vine by Daz_Black

I’m done

"Isn’t it boring being on an all vegetable diet?"

specialagentsarahbeth:

veganprobs:

image

you tell me

doseofdavis
idk this reminded me of you.

YOU KNOW ME SO WELL! 

thechristianna321:

doseofdavis your face is a gift from God

I look high in a few of those pics…oops.

(Source: hot4hairy)

I either have bug bites or a terrible skin disorder.

(Source: braddict)

(Source: beardburnme)

I see it all perfectly; there are two possible situations — one can either do this or that. My honest opinion and my friendly advice is this: do it or do not do it — you will regret both.

Soren Kierkegaard, Either/Or (via fyp-philosophy)

Hosea Ballou was riding the circuit in the New Hampshire hills with a Baptist minister one day, arguing theology as they traveled. At one point, the Baptist looked over and said,

"Brother Ballou, if I were a Universalist and feared not the fires of hell, I could hit you over the head, steal your horse and saddle, and ride away, and I’d still go to heaven."

Ballou looked over at him and said,

"If you were a Universalist, the idea would never occur to you."

It’s at this point in the conversation that I begin to wonder if she’s a universalist. Later, I follow up in an e-mail message: “Do you think that people from other faiths who don’t believe in Jesus are God’s children and will go to heaven?”
“Yes,” she writes back. “I think Jesus is divine love manifest on earth, as it comes through the community of Christians.” He’s like the “beautiful Jewish uncle” who says, “Well, I can show you the way.”
“Only Jesus has come to me, and I experience God’s love in an immediate and personal way through his companionship,” she says. Those in other countries and cultures “feel Divine Love come to them through more local teachings, through other expressions of that love.”
The idea of everyone enjoying God for eternity appeals to me—as I’m sure it does to God—yet it’s hard to reconcile with verses such as John 3:16 and Jesus’ assertion that “no one comes to the Father except through me.” On the other hand, Lamott’s tenderness toward people resembles that of the Shepherd who went looking after one stray sheep.
“Some people have been too starving, attacked, hated, or full of hate to experience God’s love,” she says. “Sometimes I think God loves the ones who most desperately ache and are most desperately lost—his or her wildest, most messed-up children—the way you’d ache and love a screwed-up rebel daughter in juvenile hall. A 5-year-old girl or her mother in the mountains of Afghanistan, a junkie in L.A., Mother Teresa, you, me, children in Gaza—God created us all and loves us and brings us home, into what may be the first shalom we have ever had the chance to experience.”
She disarmingly adds, “I don’t even pretend to understand much of anything. I just try to love and serve everyone, and bring everyone water, and lend an ear; that’s what Jesus said to do.”

Jesusy’ Anne Lamott | Christianity Today | A Magazine of Evangelical Conviction

In which Anne Lamott totally schools the interviewer with her blissful wonder, but the interviewer doesn’t notice because it’s not the right kind of Christian.

(via livenudetella)
shadowsorella:

ITS TIME FOR SCHOOL GET THE FUCK UP

shadowsorella:

ITS TIME FOR SCHOOL GET THE FUCK UP

(Source: frenchdad)

(Source: milkofboy)

(Source: squarkle)